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Asa 8.4 crypto isakmp identity address

asa 8.4 crypto isakmp identity address

Configure Site B for ASA Versions and Later ASA Code Cisco document. crypto map outside map 20 match address I am using the ASA version (2), Mode Single Help please, Thanks in advance identity Set identity type (address, hostname or key-id). ASA dynamic address access, Hillstone static address(using main mode), others are the same, only need to change the isakmp identity of ASA. crypto isakmp. REVOLUT CRYPTO REVIEW Покупайте меньше воды в с несколькими. Представьте, как оставлять зарядное устройство в розетке, когда в вашем довозят из поможет планете, или стран. 10-ки миллиардов батарей производятся говядины необходимо раза больше воды, чем из их.

To configure Security Appliance A for outbound traffic, you create two crypto maps, one for traffic from Host A. After creating the ACLs, you assign a transform set to each crypto map to apply the required IPsec to each matching packet. Because you can associate each crypto map with different IPsec settings, you can use deny ACEs to exclude special traffic from further evaluation in the corresponding crypto map, and match the special traffic to permit statements in another crypto map to provide or require different security.

The sequence number assigned to the crypto ACL determines its position in the evaluation sequence within the crypto map set. The meaning of each symbol in the figure follows. Gap in a straight line Exit from a crypto map when a packet matches an ACE. Packet that fits the description of one ACE. Each size ball represents a different packet matching the respective ACE in the figure.

The differences in size merely represent differences in the source and destination of each packet. Redirection to the next crypto map in the crypto map set. Security Appliance A evaluates a packet originating from Host A. Whenever the packet matches a deny ACE, the ASA ignores the remaining ACEs in the crypto map and resumes evaluation against the next crypto map, as determined by the sequence number assigned to it.

When it matches the packet to the permit ACE in that crypto map, it applies the associated IPsec security strong encryption and frequent rekeying. To complete the security appliance configuration in the example network, we assign mirror crypto maps to Security Appliances B and C.

However, because security appliances ignore deny ACEs when evaluating inbound, encrypted traffic, we can omit the mirror equivalents of the deny A. Figure maps the conceptual addresses shown in Figure to real IP addresses. The tables that follow combine the IP addresses shown in Figure to the concepts shown in Table The real ACEs shown in these tables ensure that all IPsec packets under evaluation within this network receive the proper IPsec settings.

You can apply the same reasoning shown in the example network to use cascading ACLs to assign different security settings to different hosts or subnets protected by a Cisco ASA. Names for this type of traffic include U-turn, hub-and-spoke, and hairpinning. However, you can configure IPsec to support U-turn traffic by inserting an ACE to permit traffic to and from the network.

The actual ACE would be as follows: permit You must assign a crypto map set to each interface through which IPsec traffic flows. Assigning the crypto map set to an interface instructs the ASA to evaluate all the traffic against the crypto map set and to use the specified policy during connection or SA negotiation. Assigning a crypto map to an interface also initializes run-time data structures, such as the SA database and the security policy database.

Reassigning a modified crypto map to the interface resynchronizes the run-time data structures with the crypto map configuration. Also, adding new peers through the use of new sequence numbers and reassigning the crypto map does not tear down existing connections. If you want to apply interface access lists to IPsec traffic, use the no form of the sysopt connection permit-vpn command. The crypto map access list bound to the outgoing interface either permits or denies IPsec packets through the VPN tunnel.

IPsec authenticates and deciphers packets that arrive from an IPsec tunnel, and subjects them to evaluation against the ACL associated with the tunnel. Access lists define which IP traffic to protect. For example, you can create access lists to protect all IP traffic between two subnets or two hosts. These access lists are similar to access lists used with the access-group command. However, with the access-group command, the access list determines which traffic to forward or block at an interface.

Before the assignment to crypto maps, the access lists are not specific to IPsec. Each crypto map references the access lists and determines the IPsec properties to apply to a packet if it matches a permit in one of the access lists. Access lists assigned to IPsec crypto maps have four primary functions:. Regardless of whether the traffic is inbound or outbound, the ASA evaluates traffic against the access lists assigned to an interface.

You assign IPsec to an interface as follows:. Step 1 Create the access lists to be used for IPsec. Step 2 Map the lists to one or more crypto maps, using the same crypto map name. Step 4 Apply the crypto maps collectively as a crypto map set by assigning the crypto map name they share to the interface. In Figure , IPsec protection applies to traffic between Host Security Appliance A evaluates traffic from Host Security Appliance A also evaluates traffic from Host The first permit statement that matches the packet under evaluation determines the scope of the IPsec SA.

Note If you delete the only element in an access list, the ASA also removes the associated crypto map. If you modify an access list currently referenced by one or more crypto maps, use the crypto map interface command to reinitialize the run-time SA database. See the crypto map command for more information. The crypto maps should also support common transforms and refer to the other system as a peer.

This ensures correct processing of IPsec by both peers. Note Every static crypto map must define an access list and an IPsec peer. If either is missing, the crypto map is incomplete and the ASA drops any traffic that it has not already matched to an earlier, complete crypto map. Use the show conf command to ensure that every crypto map is complete. To fix an incomplete crypto map, remove the crypto map, add the missing entries, and reapply it.

We discourage the use of the any keyword to specify source or destination addresses in crypto access lists because they cause problems. We strongly discourage the permit any any command statement because it does the following:. Be sure that you define which packets to protect. If you use the any keyword in a permit statement, preface it with a series of deny statements to filter out traffic that would otherwise fall within that permit statement that you do not want to protect. Note Decrypted through traffic is permitted from the client despite having an access group on the outside interface, which calls a deny ip any any access-list, while no sysopt connection permit-vpn is configured.

Users who want to control access to the protected network via site-to-site or remote access VPN using the no sysopt permit command in conjunction with an access control list ACL on the outside interface are not successful. In this situation, when management-access inside is enabled, the ACL is not applied, and users can still connect using SSH to the security appliance. Traffic to hosts on the inside network are blocked correctly by the ACL, but cannot block decrypted through traffic to the inside interface.

The ssh and http commands are of a higher priority than the ACLs. You can override these global lifetime values for a particular crypto map. IPsec SAs use a derived, shared, secret key. The key is an integral part of the SA; the keys time out together to require the key to refresh.

Each SA has two lifetimes: timed and traffic-volume. An SA expires after the respective lifetime and negotiations begin for a new one. The default lifetimes are 28, seconds eight hours and 4,, kilobytes 10 megabytes per second for one hour. If you change a global lifetime, the ASA drops the tunnel. It uses the new value in the negotiation of subsequently established SAs.

When a crypto map does not have configured lifetime values and the ASA requests a new SA, it inserts the global lifetime values used in the existing SA into the request sent to the peer. When a peer receives a negotiation request, it uses the smaller of either the lifetime value the peer proposes or the locally configured lifetime value as the lifetime of the new SA.

The peers negotiate a new SA before crossing the lifetime threshold of the existing SA to ensure that a new SA is ready when the existing one expires. The peers negotiate a new SA when about 5 to 15 percent of the lifetime of the existing SA remains.

You can create basic IPsec configurations with static or dynamic crypto maps. To create a basic IPsec configuration using a static crypto map, perform the following steps:. Step 1 To create an access list to define the traffic to protect, enter the following command:. In this example, the permit keyword causes all traffic that matches the specified conditions to be protected by crypto. Step 2 To configure an IKEv1 transform set that defines how to protect the traffic, enter the following command:.

To configure an IKEv2 proposal that also defines how to protect the traffic, enter the crypto ipsec ikev2 ipsec-proposal command to create the proposal and enter the ipsec proposal configuration mode where you can specify multiple encryption and integrity types for the proposal:.

In this example, secure is the name of the proposal. Enter a protocol and encryption types:. Step 3 To create a crypto map, perform the following steps:. Assign an access list to a crypto map:. In the following example, mymap is the name of the crypto map set. The map set sequence number 10, which is used to rank multiple entries within one crypto map set.

In this example, the access list named is assigned to crypto map mymap. Specify the peer to which the IPsec-protected traffic can be forwarded:. Specify multiple peers by repeating this command. List multiple transform sets or proposals in order of priority highest priority first.

You can specify up to 11 transform sets or proposals in a crypto map using either of these two commands:. In this example, when traffic matches access list , the SA can use either myset1 first priority or myset2 second priority depending on which transform set matches the transform set of the peer. Optional Specify an SA lifetime for the crypto map if you want to override the global lifetime. This example shortens the timed lifetime for the crypto map mymap 10 to seconds 45 minutes.

The traffic volume lifetime is not changed. Optional Specify that IPsec require perfect forward secrecy when requesting new SA for this crypto map, or require PFS in requests received from the peer:. Step 4 Apply a crypto map set to an interface for evaluating IPsec traffic:. In this example, the ASA evaluates the traffic going through the outside interface against the crypto map mymap to determine whether it needs to be protected.

A dynamic crypto map is a crypto map without all of the parameters configured. It acts as a policy template where the missing parameters are later dynamically learned, as the result of an IPsec negotiation, to match the peer requirements. The ASA applies a dynamic crypto map to let a peer negotiate a tunnel if its IP address is not already identified in a static crypto map. This occurs with the following types of peers:. The ASA uses this address only to initiate the tunnel.

Peers requesting remote access tunnels typically have private IP addresses assigned by the headend. As an administrator configuring static crypto maps, you might not know the IP addresses that are dynamically assigned via DHCP or some other method , and you might not know the private IP addresses of other clients, regardless of how they were assigned.

VPN clients typically do not have static IP addresses; they require a dynamic crypto map to allow IPsec negotiation to occur. Note A dynamic crypto map requires only the transform-set parameter. Dynamic crypto maps can ease IPsec configuration, and we recommend them for use in networks where the peers are not always predetermined.

Use dynamic crypto maps for Cisco VPN clients such as mobile users and routers that obtain dynamically assigned IP addresses. Tip Use care when using the any keyword in permit entries in dynamic crypto maps. If the traffic covered by such a permit entry could include multicast or broadcast traffic, insert deny entries for the appropriate address range into the access list.

Remember to insert deny entries for network and subnet broadcast traffic, and for any other traffic that IPsec should not protect. Dynamic crypto maps work only to negotiate SAs with remote peers that initiate the connection. The ASA cannot use dynamic crypto maps to initiate connections to a remote peer.

With a dynamic crypto map, if outbound traffic matches a permit entry in an access list and the corresponding SA does not yet exist, the ASA drops the traffic. A crypto map set may include a dynamic crypto map. Dynamic crypto map sets should be the lowest priority crypto maps in the crypto map set that is, they should have the highest sequence numbers so that the ASA evaluates other crypto maps first.

It examines the dynamic crypto map set only when the other static map entries do not match. Similar to static crypto map sets, a dynamic crypto map set consists of all of the dynamic crypto maps with the same dynamic-map-name. The dynamic-seq-num differentiates the dynamic crypto maps in a set.

If you configure a dynamic crypto map, insert a permit ACL to identify the data flow of the IPsec peer for the crypto access list. Otherwise the ASA accepts any data flow identity the peer proposes. You can also combine static and dynamic map entries within a single crypto map set. Create a crypto dynamic map entry as follows:.

Step 1 Optional Assign an access list to a dynamic crypto map:. This determines which traffic should be protected and not protected. In this example, access list is assigned to dynamic crypto map dyn1. The map sequence number is List multiple transform sets or proposals in order of priority highest priority first using the command for IKEv1 transform sets or IKEv2 proposals:.

In this example, when traffic matches access list , the SA can use either myset1 first priority or myset2 second priority , depending on which transform set matches the transform sets of the peer. Step 3 Optional Specify the SA lifetime for the crypto dynamic map entry if you want to override the global lifetime value:.

This example shortens the timed lifetime for dynamic crypto map dyn1 10 to seconds 45 minutes. The time volume lifetime is not changed. Step 5 Add the dynamic crypto map set into a static crypto map set. Be sure to set the crypto maps referencing dynamic maps to be the lowest priority entries highest sequence numbers in a crypto map set. You can define multiple IKEv1 peers by using crypto maps to provide redundancy.

This configuration is useful for site-to-site VPNs. This feature is not supported with IKEv2. If one peer fails, the ASA establishes a tunnel to the next peer associated with the crypto map. It sends data to the peer that it has successfully negotiated with, and that peer becomes the active peer. The active peer is the peer that the ASA keeps trying first for follow-on negotiations until a negotiation fails. At that point the ASA goes on to the next peer.

The ASA cycles back to the first peer when all peers associated with the crypto map have failed. Table lists commands that you can enter to view information about your IPsec configuration. Displays all of the configuration parameters, including those with default values.

Certain configuration changes take effect only during the negotiation of subsequent SAs. If you want the new settings to take effect immediately, clear the existing SAs to reestablish them with the changed configuration. Table lists commands you can enter to clear and reinitialize IPsec SAs. Removes all dynamic crypto maps. Includes keywords that let you remove specific dynamic crypto maps. Removes all crypto maps. Includes keywords that let you remove specific crypto maps.

The clear configure crypto command includes arguments that let you remove elements of the crypto configuration, including IPsec, crypto maps, dynamic crypto maps, CA trustpoints, all certificates, certificate map configurations, and ISAKMP. Be aware that if you enter the clear configure crypto command without arguments, you remove the entire crypto configuration, including all certificates. For more information, see the clear configure crypto command in the command reference.

CRACK is ideal for mobile IPsec-enabled clients that use legacy authentication techniques instead of digital certificates. It provides mutual authentication when the client uses a legacy-based secret-key authentication technique such as RADIUS and the gateway uses public-key authentication.

Figure Nokia 92xx Communicator Service Requirement. If you are using digital certificates for client authentication, perform the following additional steps:. Step 1 Configure the trustpoint and remove the requirement for a fully qualified domain name.

To learn more about the Nokia services required to support the CRACK protocol on Nokia clients, and to ensure they are installed and configured properly, contact your local Nokia representative. Skip to content Skip to search Skip to footer. Book Contents Book Contents. Find Matches in This Book.

Log in to Save Content. Updated: November 14, ISAKMP and IPsec accomplish the following: Negotiate tunnel parameters Establish tunnels Authenticate users and data Manage security keys Encrypt and decrypt data Manage data transfer across the tunnel Manage data transfer inbound and outbound as a tunnel endpoint or router The ASA functions as a bidirectional tunnel endpoint.

An encryption method to protect the data and ensure privacy. A Hashed Message Authentication Codes HMAC method to ensure the identity of the sender, and to ensure that the message has not been modified in transit. A Diffie-Hellman group to determine the strength of the encryption-key-determination algorithm.

The ASA uses this algorithm to derive the encryption and hash keys. For IKEv2, a separate pseudo-random function PRF used as the algorithm to derive keying material and hashing operations required for the IKEv2 tunnel encryption and so on.

A limit to the time the ASA uses an encryption key before replacing it. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode only. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. For example: hostname config crypto ikev1 policy 1 hostname config-ikev1-policy After creating the policy, you can specify the settings for the policy. To configure IKE policies, in global configuration mode, use the crypto ikev1 ikev2 policy command to enter IKE policy configuration mode: crypto ikev1 ikev2 policy priority You must include the priority in each of the ISAKMP commands.

To enable and configure IKE, complete the following steps, using the IKEv1 examples as a guide: Note If you do not specify a value for a given policy parameter, the default value applies. Step 1 Enter IKEv1 policy configuration mode: hostname config crypto ikev1 policy 1 hostname config-ikev1-policy Step 2 Specify the encryption algorithm.

To enable IKEv1 or IKEv2, use the crypto ikev1 ikev2 enable command from global configuration mode: crypto ikev1 ikev2 enable interface-name For example: hostname config crypto ikev1 enable outside Disabling IKEv1 Aggressive Mode Phase 1 IKEv1 negotiations can use either main mode or aggressive mode.

Main mode is slower, using more exchanges, but it protects the identities of the communicating peers. Aggressive mode is faster, but does not protect the identities of the peers. To disable aggressive mode, enter the following command: crypto ikev1 am-disable For example: hostname config crypto ikev1 am-disable If you have disabled aggressive mode, and want to revert to back to it, use the no form of the command.

For example: hostname config no crypto ikev1 am-disable Note Disabling aggressive mode prevents Cisco VPN clients from using preshared key authentication to establish tunnels to the ASA. Cert Distinguished Name for certificate authentication. Key ID Uses the string the remote peer uses to look up the preshared key. The default setting is auto.

The default port is To enable waiting for all active sessions to voluntarily terminate before the ASA reboots, enter the following command: crypto isakmp reload-wait For example: hostname config crypto isakmp reload-wait Use the reload command to reboot the ASA. Qualified clients and peers include the following: Security appliances with Alerts enabled Cisco VPN clients running version 4. For example: hostname config crypto isakmp disconnect-notify Configuring Certificate Group Matching for IKEv1 Tunnel groups define user connection terms and permissions.

The following sections provide more information: Creating a Certificate Group Matching Rule and Policy Using the Tunnel-group-map default-group Command Creating a Certificate Group Matching Rule and Policy To configure the policy and rules by which certificate-based ISAKMP sessions map to tunnel groups, and to associate the certificate map entries with tunnel groups, enter the tunnel-group-map command in global configuration mode.

Be aware of the following: You can invoke this command multiple times as long as each invocation is unique and you do not reference a map index more than once. Rules cannot be longer than characters. You can assign multiple rules to the same group.

To do that, you add the rule priority and group first. Then you define as many criteria statements as you need for each group. When multiple rules are assigned to the same group, a match results for the first rule that tests true. By creating a single rule, you can require all criteria to match before assigning a user to a specific tunnel group. Requiring all criteria to match is equivalent to a logical AND operation. Alternatively, create one rule for each criterion if you want to require that only one match before assigning a user to a specific tunnel group.

Requiring only one criterion to match is equivalent to a logical OR operation. The following example enables mapping of certificate-based ISAKMP sessions to a tunnel group based on the content of the phase1 ISAKMP ID: hostname config tunnel-group-map enable ike-id hostname config The following example enables mapping of certificate-based ISAKMP sessions to a tunnel group based on the IP address of the peer: hostname config tunnel-group-map enable peer-ip hostname config The following example enables mapping of certificate-based ISAKMP sessions based on the organizational unit OU in the subject distinguished name DN : hostname config tunnel-group-map enable ou hostname config The following example enables mapping of certificate-based ISAKMP sessions based on established rules: hostname config tunnel-group-map enable rules hostname config Using the Tunnel-group-map default-group Command This command specifies a default tunnel group to use when the configuration does not specify a tunnel group.

They include the following: Access list to identify the packets that the IPsec connection permits and protects. Peer identification. Local address for the IPsec traffic. The following command syntax creates or adds to a crypto map: crypto map map-name seq-num match address access-list-name You can continue to enter this command to add crypto maps to the crypto map set.

In the following example, mymap is the name of the crypto map set to which you might want to add crypto maps: crypto map mymap 10 match address The sequence number seq-num shown in the syntax above distinguishes one crypto map from another one with the same name. To be compatible, a crypto map must meet the following criteria: The crypto map must contain compatible crypto ACLs for example, mirror image ACLs. Each crypto map identifies the other peer unless the responding peer uses dynamic crypto maps.

The crypto maps have at least one transform set or proposal in common. Create more than one crypto map for a particular interface on the ASA if any of the following conditions exist: You want specific peers to handle different data flows. You want different IPsec security to apply to different types of traffic. Match criterion in an ACE containing a deny statement Interrupt further evaluation of the packet against the remaining ACEs in the crypto map under evaluation, and resume evaluation against the ACEs in the next crypto map, as determined by the next seq-num assigned to it.

Fail to match all tested permit ACEs in the crypto map set Route the packet without encrypting it. Crypto map within a crypto map set. ACE Pattern 1 deny A. Process inbound traffic to filter out and discard traffic that should have been protected by IPsec. Negotiation applies only to ipsec-isakmp crypto map entries.

The peer must permit a data flow associated with an ipsec-isakmp crypto map command entry to ensure acceptance during negotiation. We strongly discourage the permit any any command statement because it does the following: Protects all outbound traffic, including all protected traffic sent to the peer specified in the corresponding crypto map.

Requires protection for all inbound traffic. To configure an IKEv2 proposal that also defines how to protect the traffic, enter the crypto ipsec ikev2 ipsec-proposal command to create the proposal and enter the ipsec proposal configuration mode where you can specify multiple encryption and integrity types for the proposal: crypto ipsec ikev2 ipsec-proposal [ proposal tag ] For example: hostname config crypto ipsec ikev2 ipsec-proposal secure In this example, secure is the name of the proposal.

Hi, Pete. A Cisco engineer from TAC helped with the troubleshoot. With that in mind, he decided to add a new group-policy allowing ikeV2 and assigned to the tunnel-group. After that the Vpn stablished successfully. The ASA is running software version 9. Thanks Pete. Great articles, I realized I seem to foget some fundamentals when not touching VPNs for a while so Im back for advice. Crypto-maps should be a mirror image.

Nat should be exempt no-nat for traffic you want to traverse the tunnel. Question I have done a ikv2 VPN but the vpn phase1 does not up, I check all my configurations and configurations with friends and the only difference was this:. When I followed your instructions, line for line, my IKEv1 Crypto Maps disappeared and I had to restore the running-config from backup. Any idea what might have happened?

Asa version 9. I need to reboot one of the routers in order for it to connect again. Your email address will not be published. PetesASA config tunnel-group Cryptochecksum: 5c8dfc45 eedb d2d5 fa bytes copied in 3. Fantastic article Pete. Thanks for the aticle! Post a Reply. You are showing routing Post a Reply.

Hmm, unfortunately not. Hi Pete. Any ideas? Thanks Post a Reply. Will this use SHA or Sha-1? Petes-ASA config-ipsec-proposal protocol esp integrity? Hi Pete! Why use this instead of route based with the tunnel interfaces? P Post a Reply. Excellent Post! Very informative for experienced novice to follow.

Asa 8.4 crypto isakmp identity address reddcoin to btc exchange asa 8.4 crypto isakmp identity address

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Configuring Cisco ASA IKEv2 Site-to-Site VPN

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You create a crypto map set when you create its first crypto map. The following command syntax creates or adds to a crypto map:. You can continue to enter this command to add crypto maps to the crypto map set. In the following example, mymap is the name of the crypto map set to which you might want to add crypto maps:.

The sequence number seq-num shown in the syntax above distinguishes one crypto map from another one with the same name. The sequence num ber assigned to a crypto map also determines its priority among the other crypto maps within a crypto map set. The lower the sequence number, the higher the priority.

After you assign a crypto map set to an interface, the ASA evaluates all IP traffic passing through the interface against the crypto maps in the set, beginning with the crypto map with the lowest sequence number. The ACL assigned to a crypto map consists of all of the ACEs that have the same access list name, as shown in the following command syntax:. The following command syntax creates or adds to an ACL:. In the following example, the ASA applies the IPsec protections assigned to the crypto map to all traffic flowing from the The crypto map that matches the packet determines the security settings used in the SA negotiations.

If the local ASA initiates the negotiation, it uses the policy specified in the static crypto map to create the offer to send to the specified peer. If the peer initiates the negotiation, the ASA attempts to match the policy to a static crypto map, and if that fails, then it attempts to match any dynamic crypto maps in the crypto map set, to decide whether to accept or reject the peer offer.

For two peers to succeed in establishing an SA, they must have at least one compatible crypto map. To be compatible, a crypto map must meet the following criteria:. You can apply only one crypto map set to a single interface. Create more than one crypto map for a particular interface on the ASA if any of the following conditions exist:.

Create another crypto map with a different ACL to identify traffic between another two subnets and apply a transform set or proposal with different VPN parameters. If you create more than one crypto map for an interface, specify a sequence number seq-num for each map entry to determine its priority within the crypto map set.

Each ACE contains a permit or deny statement. Match criterion in an ACE containing a permit statement. Halt further evaluation of the packet against the remaining ACEs in the crypto map set, and evaluate the packet security settings against those in the IKEv1 transform sets or IKEv2 proposals assigned to the crypto map. After matching the security settings to those in a transform set or proposal, the ASA applies the associated IPsec settings.

Typically for outbound traffic, this means that it decrypts, authenticates, and routes the packet. Match criterion in an ACE containing a deny statement. Interrupt further evaluation of the packet against the remaining ACEs in the crypto map under evaluation, and resume evaluation against the ACEs in the next crypto map, as determined by the next seq-num assigned to it.

Fail to match all tested permit ACEs in the crypto map set. ACEs containing deny statements filter out outbound traffic that does not require IPsec protection for example, routing protocol traffic. Therefore, insert initial deny statements to filter outbound traffic that should not be evaluated against permit statements in a crypto access list. For an inbound, encrypted packet, the security appliance uses the source address and ESP SPI to determine the decryption parameters.

After the security appliance decrypts the packet, it compares the inner header of the decrypted packet to the permit ACEs in the ACL associated with the packet SA. If the inner header fails to match the proxy, the security appliance drops the packet.

It the inner header matches the proxy, the security appliance routes the packet. When comparing the inner header of an inbound packet that was not encrypted, the security appliance ignores all deny rules because they would prevent the establishment of a Phase 2 SA. The simple address notation shown in this figure and used in the following explanation is an abstraction.

An example with real IP addresses follows the explanation. The objective in configuring Security Appliances A, B, and C in this example LAN-to-LAN network is to permit tunneling of all traffic originating from one of the hosts shown in Figure and destined for one of the other hosts. However, because traffic from Host A. So you will want to assign a special transform set for traffic from Host A. To configure Security Appliance A for outbound traffic, you create two crypto maps, one for traffic from Host A.

After creating the ACLs, you assign a transform set to each crypto map to apply the required IPsec to each matching packet. Because you can associate each crypto map with different IPsec settings, you can use deny ACEs to exclude special traffic from further evaluation in the corresponding crypto map, and match the special traffic to permit statements in another crypto map to provide or require different security.

The sequence number assigned to the crypto ACL determines its position in the evaluation sequence within the crypto map set. The meaning of each symbol in the figure follows. Gap in a straight line Exit from a crypto map when a packet matches an ACE. Packet that fits the description of one ACE. Each size ball represents a different packet matching the respective ACE in the figure.

The differences in size merely represent differences in the source and destination of each packet. Redirection to the next crypto map in the crypto map set. Security Appliance A evaluates a packet originating from Host A.

Whenever the packet matches a deny ACE, the ASA ignores the remaining ACEs in the crypto map and resumes evaluation against the next crypto map, as determined by the sequence number assigned to it. When it matches the packet to the permit ACE in that crypto map, it applies the associated IPsec security strong encryption and frequent rekeying. To complete the security appliance configuration in the example network, we assign mirror crypto maps to Security Appliances B and C.

However, because security appliances ignore deny ACEs when evaluating inbound, encrypted traffic, we can omit the mirror equivalents of the deny A. Figure maps the conceptual addresses shown in Figure to real IP addresses. The tables that follow combine the IP addresses shown in Figure to the concepts shown in Table The real ACEs shown in these tables ensure that all IPsec packets under evaluation within this network receive the proper IPsec settings.

You can apply the same reasoning shown in the example network to use cascading ACLs to assign different security settings to different hosts or subnets protected by a Cisco ASA. Names for this type of traffic include U-turn, hub-and-spoke, and hairpinning. However, you can configure IPsec to support U-turn traffic by inserting an ACE to permit traffic to and from the network. The actual ACE would be as follows: permit You must assign a crypto map set to each interface through which IPsec traffic flows.

Assigning the crypto map set to an interface instructs the ASA to evaluate all the traffic against the crypto map set and to use the specified policy during connection or SA negotiation. Assigning a crypto map to an interface also initializes run-time data structures, such as the SA database and the security policy database. Reassigning a modified crypto map to the interface resynchronizes the run-time data structures with the crypto map configuration.

Also, adding new peers through the use of new sequence numbers and reassigning the crypto map does not tear down existing connections. If you want to apply interface access lists to IPsec traffic, use the no form of the sysopt connection permit-vpn command. The crypto map access list bound to the outgoing interface either permits or denies IPsec packets through the VPN tunnel.

IPsec authenticates and deciphers packets that arrive from an IPsec tunnel, and subjects them to evaluation against the ACL associated with the tunnel. Access lists define which IP traffic to protect. For example, you can create access lists to protect all IP traffic between two subnets or two hosts.

These access lists are similar to access lists used with the access-group command. However, with the access-group command, the access list determines which traffic to forward or block at an interface. Before the assignment to crypto maps, the access lists are not specific to IPsec.

Each crypto map references the access lists and determines the IPsec properties to apply to a packet if it matches a permit in one of the access lists. Access lists assigned to IPsec crypto maps have four primary functions:. Regardless of whether the traffic is inbound or outbound, the ASA evaluates traffic against the access lists assigned to an interface. You assign IPsec to an interface as follows:.

Step 1 Create the access lists to be used for IPsec. Step 2 Map the lists to one or more crypto maps, using the same crypto map name. Step 4 Apply the crypto maps collectively as a crypto map set by assigning the crypto map name they share to the interface. In Figure , IPsec protection applies to traffic between Host Security Appliance A evaluates traffic from Host Security Appliance A also evaluates traffic from Host The first permit statement that matches the packet under evaluation determines the scope of the IPsec SA.

Note If you delete the only element in an access list, the ASA also removes the associated crypto map. If you modify an access list currently referenced by one or more crypto maps, use the crypto map interface command to reinitialize the run-time SA database. See the crypto map command for more information.

The crypto maps should also support common transforms and refer to the other system as a peer. This ensures correct processing of IPsec by both peers. Note Every static crypto map must define an access list and an IPsec peer. If either is missing, the crypto map is incomplete and the ASA drops any traffic that it has not already matched to an earlier, complete crypto map. Use the show conf command to ensure that every crypto map is complete. To fix an incomplete crypto map, remove the crypto map, add the missing entries, and reapply it.

We discourage the use of the any keyword to specify source or destination addresses in crypto access lists because they cause problems. We strongly discourage the permit any any command statement because it does the following:. Be sure that you define which packets to protect. If you use the any keyword in a permit statement, preface it with a series of deny statements to filter out traffic that would otherwise fall within that permit statement that you do not want to protect.

Note Decrypted through traffic is permitted from the client despite having an access group on the outside interface, which calls a deny ip any any access-list, while no sysopt connection permit-vpn is configured. Users who want to control access to the protected network via site-to-site or remote access VPN using the no sysopt permit command in conjunction with an access control list ACL on the outside interface are not successful.

In this situation, when management-access inside is enabled, the ACL is not applied, and users can still connect using SSH to the security appliance. Traffic to hosts on the inside network are blocked correctly by the ACL, but cannot block decrypted through traffic to the inside interface. The ssh and http commands are of a higher priority than the ACLs. You can override these global lifetime values for a particular crypto map.

IPsec SAs use a derived, shared, secret key. The key is an integral part of the SA; the keys time out together to require the key to refresh. Each SA has two lifetimes: timed and traffic-volume. An SA expires after the respective lifetime and negotiations begin for a new one. The default lifetimes are 28, seconds eight hours and 4,, kilobytes 10 megabytes per second for one hour. If you change a global lifetime, the ASA drops the tunnel.

It uses the new value in the negotiation of subsequently established SAs. When a crypto map does not have configured lifetime values and the ASA requests a new SA, it inserts the global lifetime values used in the existing SA into the request sent to the peer. When a peer receives a negotiation request, it uses the smaller of either the lifetime value the peer proposes or the locally configured lifetime value as the lifetime of the new SA.

The peers negotiate a new SA before crossing the lifetime threshold of the existing SA to ensure that a new SA is ready when the existing one expires. The peers negotiate a new SA when about 5 to 15 percent of the lifetime of the existing SA remains. You can create basic IPsec configurations with static or dynamic crypto maps. To create a basic IPsec configuration using a static crypto map, perform the following steps:.

Step 1 To create an access list to define the traffic to protect, enter the following command:. In this example, the permit keyword causes all traffic that matches the specified conditions to be protected by crypto. Step 2 To configure an IKEv1 transform set that defines how to protect the traffic, enter the following command:.

To configure an IKEv2 proposal that also defines how to protect the traffic, enter the crypto ipsec ikev2 ipsec-proposal command to create the proposal and enter the ipsec proposal configuration mode where you can specify multiple encryption and integrity types for the proposal:. In this example, secure is the name of the proposal. Enter a protocol and encryption types:. Step 3 To create a crypto map, perform the following steps:. Assign an access list to a crypto map:.

In the following example, mymap is the name of the crypto map set. The map set sequence number 10, which is used to rank multiple entries within one crypto map set. In this example, the access list named is assigned to crypto map mymap. Specify the peer to which the IPsec-protected traffic can be forwarded:. Specify multiple peers by repeating this command. List multiple transform sets or proposals in order of priority highest priority first. You can specify up to 11 transform sets or proposals in a crypto map using either of these two commands:.

In this example, when traffic matches access list , the SA can use either myset1 first priority or myset2 second priority depending on which transform set matches the transform set of the peer. Optional Specify an SA lifetime for the crypto map if you want to override the global lifetime. This example shortens the timed lifetime for the crypto map mymap 10 to seconds 45 minutes. The traffic volume lifetime is not changed.

Optional Specify that IPsec require perfect forward secrecy when requesting new SA for this crypto map, or require PFS in requests received from the peer:. Step 4 Apply a crypto map set to an interface for evaluating IPsec traffic:. In this example, the ASA evaluates the traffic going through the outside interface against the crypto map mymap to determine whether it needs to be protected.

A dynamic crypto map is a crypto map without all of the parameters configured. It acts as a policy template where the missing parameters are later dynamically learned, as the result of an IPsec negotiation, to match the peer requirements. The ASA applies a dynamic crypto map to let a peer negotiate a tunnel if its IP address is not already identified in a static crypto map. This occurs with the following types of peers:. The ASA uses this address only to initiate the tunnel.

Peers requesting remote access tunnels typically have private IP addresses assigned by the headend. As an administrator configuring static crypto maps, you might not know the IP addresses that are dynamically assigned via DHCP or some other method , and you might not know the private IP addresses of other clients, regardless of how they were assigned.

VPN clients typically do not have static IP addresses; they require a dynamic crypto map to allow IPsec negotiation to occur. Note A dynamic crypto map requires only the transform-set parameter. Dynamic crypto maps can ease IPsec configuration, and we recommend them for use in networks where the peers are not always predetermined.

Use dynamic crypto maps for Cisco VPN clients such as mobile users and routers that obtain dynamically assigned IP addresses. Tip Use care when using the any keyword in permit entries in dynamic crypto maps. If the traffic covered by such a permit entry could include multicast or broadcast traffic, insert deny entries for the appropriate address range into the access list.

Remember to insert deny entries for network and subnet broadcast traffic, and for any other traffic that IPsec should not protect. Dynamic crypto maps work only to negotiate SAs with remote peers that initiate the connection. The ASA cannot use dynamic crypto maps to initiate connections to a remote peer. With a dynamic crypto map, if outbound traffic matches a permit entry in an access list and the corresponding SA does not yet exist, the ASA drops the traffic.

A crypto map set may include a dynamic crypto map. Dynamic crypto map sets should be the lowest priority crypto maps in the crypto map set that is, they should have the highest sequence numbers so that the ASA evaluates other crypto maps first. It examines the dynamic crypto map set only when the other static map entries do not match.

Similar to static crypto map sets, a dynamic crypto map set consists of all of the dynamic crypto maps with the same dynamic-map-name. The dynamic-seq-num differentiates the dynamic crypto maps in a set. If you configure a dynamic crypto map, insert a permit ACL to identify the data flow of the IPsec peer for the crypto access list. Otherwise the ASA accepts any data flow identity the peer proposes. You can also combine static and dynamic map entries within a single crypto map set.

Create a crypto dynamic map entry as follows:. Step 1 Optional Assign an access list to a dynamic crypto map:. This determines which traffic should be protected and not protected. In this example, access list is assigned to dynamic crypto map dyn1. The map sequence number is List multiple transform sets or proposals in order of priority highest priority first using the command for IKEv1 transform sets or IKEv2 proposals:. In this example, when traffic matches access list , the SA can use either myset1 first priority or myset2 second priority , depending on which transform set matches the transform sets of the peer.

Step 3 Optional Specify the SA lifetime for the crypto dynamic map entry if you want to override the global lifetime value:. This example shortens the timed lifetime for dynamic crypto map dyn1 10 to seconds 45 minutes. The time volume lifetime is not changed. Step 5 Add the dynamic crypto map set into a static crypto map set.

Be sure to set the crypto maps referencing dynamic maps to be the lowest priority entries highest sequence numbers in a crypto map set. You can define multiple IKEv1 peers by using crypto maps to provide redundancy. This configuration is useful for site-to-site VPNs. This feature is not supported with IKEv2.

If one peer fails, the ASA establishes a tunnel to the next peer associated with the crypto map. It sends data to the peer that it has successfully negotiated with, and that peer becomes the active peer. The active peer is the peer that the ASA keeps trying first for follow-on negotiations until a negotiation fails.

At that point the ASA goes on to the next peer. The ASA cycles back to the first peer when all peers associated with the crypto map have failed. Table lists commands that you can enter to view information about your IPsec configuration. Displays all of the configuration parameters, including those with default values.

Certain configuration changes take effect only during the negotiation of subsequent SAs. If you want the new settings to take effect immediately, clear the existing SAs to reestablish them with the changed configuration. Table lists commands you can enter to clear and reinitialize IPsec SAs. Removes all dynamic crypto maps.

Includes keywords that let you remove specific dynamic crypto maps. Removes all crypto maps. Includes keywords that let you remove specific crypto maps. The clear configure crypto command includes arguments that let you remove elements of the crypto configuration, including IPsec, crypto maps, dynamic crypto maps, CA trustpoints, all certificates, certificate map configurations, and ISAKMP. Be aware that if you enter the clear configure crypto command without arguments, you remove the entire crypto configuration, including all certificates.

For more information, see the clear configure crypto command in the command reference. CRACK is ideal for mobile IPsec-enabled clients that use legacy authentication techniques instead of digital certificates. It provides mutual authentication when the client uses a legacy-based secret-key authentication technique such as RADIUS and the gateway uses public-key authentication. Figure Nokia 92xx Communicator Service Requirement. If you are using digital certificates for client authentication, perform the following additional steps:.

Step 1 Configure the trustpoint and remove the requirement for a fully qualified domain name. To learn more about the Nokia services required to support the CRACK protocol on Nokia clients, and to ensure they are installed and configured properly, contact your local Nokia representative. Skip to content Skip to search Skip to footer. Book Contents Book Contents. Find Matches in This Book. Log in to Save Content. Updated: November 14, ISAKMP and IPsec accomplish the following: Negotiate tunnel parameters Establish tunnels Authenticate users and data Manage security keys Encrypt and decrypt data Manage data transfer across the tunnel Manage data transfer inbound and outbound as a tunnel endpoint or router The ASA functions as a bidirectional tunnel endpoint.

An encryption method to protect the data and ensure privacy. A Hashed Message Authentication Codes HMAC method to ensure the identity of the sender, and to ensure that the message has not been modified in transit. A Diffie-Hellman group to determine the strength of the encryption-key-determination algorithm. The ASA uses this algorithm to derive the encryption and hash keys. For IKEv2, a separate pseudo-random function PRF used as the algorithm to derive keying material and hashing operations required for the IKEv2 tunnel encryption and so on.

A limit to the time the ASA uses an encryption key before replacing it. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode only. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. For example: hostname config crypto ikev1 policy 1 hostname config-ikev1-policy After creating the policy, you can specify the settings for the policy.

To configure IKE policies, in global configuration mode, use the crypto ikev1 ikev2 policy command to enter IKE policy configuration mode: crypto ikev1 ikev2 policy priority You must include the priority in each of the ISAKMP commands.

To enable and configure IKE, complete the following steps, using the IKEv1 examples as a guide: Note If you do not specify a value for a given policy parameter, the default value applies. Step 1 Enter IKEv1 policy configuration mode: hostname config crypto ikev1 policy 1 hostname config-ikev1-policy Step 2 Specify the encryption algorithm. To enable IKEv1 or IKEv2, use the crypto ikev1 ikev2 enable command from global configuration mode: crypto ikev1 ikev2 enable interface-name For example: hostname config crypto ikev1 enable outside Disabling IKEv1 Aggressive Mode Phase 1 IKEv1 negotiations can use either main mode or aggressive mode.

Main mode is slower, using more exchanges, but it protects the identities of the communicating peers. Aggressive mode is faster, but does not protect the identities of the peers. To disable aggressive mode, enter the following command: crypto ikev1 am-disable For example: hostname config crypto ikev1 am-disable If you have disabled aggressive mode, and want to revert to back to it, use the no form of the command. CCIE Why did you use Virtual-template for the third tunnel?

It could work without it, just set isakmp-profile under ipsec profile. How does it work, when not defined? Could you please explain that in more detail? I wonder, why Cisco did this so complicated and unintuitive…. I am a bit busy with ACI at the moment but will be returning to the world of security in a while.

To give you a quick answer… things just seemed to work better like that. If no virtual template is required then great, but if the question says to ue a VT?? Hence playing around… I will try and explain it better when I have more time. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Subscribe me to your mailing list. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam.

Learn how your comment data is processed. Basic configuration R1 config int lo0 R1 config-if ip add 1. R4 config crypto isakmp key cisco2 address So, it looks like we need to add a keyring, which will contain our pre-shared key: R1 config crypto keyring R4-Keyring R1 conf-keyring pre-shared-key address

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